One week to solar eclipse

Observed object: Sun and sunspot group AR 2297
Date: 22.03.2015
Time: 10:15 UT
Observing site: Kuusamo, Finland
Instrument: Canon EOS 1100D, 4” refractor

Today when I’m writing this post, it’s exactly one week to go to the solar eclipse! Now weather has been really fantastic, days and nights have been clear and now the length of the day almost equals the length of the night! I’m just a bit worried about the timing of this period of clear skies, I’m now wondering, how long it lasts? Does it last until the eclipse day? Let’s keep our fingers crossed!

Yesterday (12.3.2015) I was practicing solar photography with my telescope here in Kuusamo. My telescope was f/9.8/4” refractor (102mm/1000mm). My camera is Canon EOS 1100D. I’m using solar filter made of Astrosolar -filter material. Yeasterday there was large group of sunspots, and it was so large, that it was well visible with naked eye too!

I noticed, that it is good idea to keep the exposure time as short as possible. The exposure time can be as short as 1/400 to 1/800 seconds or even shorter. Then camera “freezes” the turbulence of atmosphere better, and the sunspots become more clearly visible. ISO value can be something like 100-400. White balance should be on in daylight- or sunlight setting.

So, today I’m going to carry on the rehearsals. I just might report them here later, so keep on looking my blog! 🙂

Here you can see the results of the rehearsals of yesterday:

_MG_3919
Sun photographed 12.3. in Kuusamo, Finland with 4” refractor and Canon EOS 1100D.
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3 thoughts on “One week to solar eclipse

  1. FlyTrapMan March 14, 2015 / 01:10

    You’re right — you need to keep the exposures pretty quick. If you have not already considered this: I highly recommend zooming in on a sunspot before focusing (if weather permits).

    I’ll be on the look out for any eclipse images!

  2. Juha Ojanperä March 14, 2015 / 19:07

    Thanks for a comment! Yep, I’m always trying to focus the telescope as well as possible with zooming to sunspots.

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