Observing in Ulvila observatory 12./13.4.2016

Date: 12./13.04.2016
Time: 23:00-00:30
Observing site: Ulvila observatory, Finland
Instrument: C280/2750mm (11” Catadioptric)

NELM: 5.3
SQM: 20.26-20.45
Darkness of the background sky: 3
Seeing: 2
Transparency: –
Weather: Clear sky, calm, snow has already melted away, some mist, +4 C

Objects observed: NGC 5273, 4800, 4143, 4111, 4346

The night between 12th and 13th of April 2016 was going to be the last observing not for me in season 2015-2016. During that night, I was observing in Ulvila observatory, and during the night I observed 5 galaxies in constellation of Canes venatici. After having completed this session, my total amount of completed and published observations from this season is exactly 100.

During this  last night sthere was no snow on the ground anymore, but on the other hand, nights are already very short and darkness comes late. The observing conditions were roughly on a good average level in terms of Ulvila observatory, NELM 5.3 and SQM ~20.2-20.4.

NGC 5273

NGC 5273 is a small galaxy in Canes venatici, located 10 degrees SE from alpha Canum venaticorum. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

A small, faint galaxy, that is elongated in NE-SW direction, almost stellar.

160412-13_MGC 5273
NGC 5273 observed with 11” catadioptric.

NGC 4800

NGC 4800 is yet another faint galaxy in Canes Venatici, it is located 6,5 degrees NE from beta Canomu venaticorum. Of this galaxy, I wrote as follows:

A small, but pretty bright galaxy, the galaxy has rather stellar but faint core. The galaxy brightens towards the core. The galaxy is slightly oval shaped, and it’s long axis is in NE-SW direction. Easy one!

160412-13_NGC 4800
NGC 4800 observed with 11” catadioptric.

NGC  4143

NGC 4143 is a galaxy, that is located in westernmost part of the constellation, 4,5 degrees NW from beta Canum venaticorum. Of this galaxy, I wrote following notes:

A small, pretty bright, oval -shaped galaxy, long axis in N-S direction, the galaxy has a bright core. Pretty easy!

160412-13_NGC 4143
NGC 4143 observed with 11” catadioptric.

NGC 4111

NGC 4111 is a thin, edge on galaxy located in Canes venaticorum, in the westernmostt part of the constellation, just at the Canes venaticorum-Ursa major border. Of this galaxy, I wrtoe following notes:

A small and thin edge-on galaxy, the galaxy has almost stellar core, easy!

160412-13_NGC 4111
NGC 4111 observed with 11” catadioptric.

NGC 4346

NGC 4346  is a galaxy that is located near Messier 106, just less than a degree ESE from it. Of this galaxy, I wrote following notes:

A small, rather faint and thin galaxy, elongated in E-W direction, the galaxy has rather bright core.

160412-13_NGC 4346
NGC 4346 observed with 11” catadioptric.
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Observing on Mt. Teide 8./9.4.2016

Date: 8./9.4.2016
Time: 22:45-01:00 (local time)
Observing site: El Retamar (2100m), Teide N.P., Tenerife, Spain
Instrument: L80/400mm (3” refractor)

NELM: 6.6
SQM: 21.05-21.25
Darkness of the background sky: 1
Seeing: 2
Transparency: 1
Weather: Clear sky, gusty, fresh breeze, +8 C

Objects observed: NGC 2451, 2546, 2467, 2571 and 2567

During my fourth and last night of observing on Mt. Teide, I was observing 5 objects in the constellation of Puppis. During the night it was very windy, and I was tired. Because of combination of these two factors, I didn’t felt motivated to start observing, but nevertheless I was able to motivate myself, and I’m glad I made those 5 observations during the night.

During the night I measured lowest SQM readings during my trip, at lowest it was as low as 21.05. This is still a good reading especially in terms of Finland, but in terms of Teide it is a lowered reading. I din’t know reason for this, but actually it could have been caused by dust on my SQM -meter. Before leaving, I wiped off some dust from the sensonr of the SMQ -meter, and the reading jumped to 21.25. That is higher, but still considerably lower than the best readings I usually had during previous nights.

NGC 2451

My first object was NGC 2451, an open cluster located in Puppis, four degrees NW from zeta Puppis. With my instrument, it is in the same field with NGC 2477, which I has observed already earlier. Of NGC 2451 I wrote following notes:

A pretty large and bright starred cluster, not very concentrated but it is still well detached. In the middle of this cluster, there is a bright-starred triangle, the star in the upper right corner if this triangle is intensively red! NGC 2477 was visible as a nebulous patch 1,5 degrees east from the cluster.

160408-09_NGC 2451
NGC 2451 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 2546

NGC 2546 is an open cluster in Puppis, located 3 degrees NE from zeta Puppis. Of thos object, I wrote following notes:

an open cluster, that is elongated in NW-SE -direction. The cluster is rather faint-starred. It is not very concentrated, and it is moderately detached from it’s background.

160408-09_NGC 2546
NGC 2546 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 2467

NGC 2467 is an open cluster+nebula combination in the northern part of Puppis, located two degrees SE from xi Puppis. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

A rather faint, roundish open cluster+nebula. The cluster itself wasn’t much visible, but the nebula was easy and obvious. The nebula was already weakly visible without OIII filter, but with the filter it became visible very well.

160408-09_NGC 2467
NGC 2467 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 2571

NGC 2571 is an open cluster located in eastern part of Puppis, 6 degrees SE from rho Puppis. Of this object I wrote following notes:

A small, faint-starred cluster. The cluster is moderately detached and -concentrated.

160408-09_NGC 2571
NGC 2571 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 2567

NGC 2567 is an open cluster in Puppis, it is located less than degree south from NGC 2571. Of NGC 2567 I wrote following notes:

A small, faint and compact cluster, well concentrated and detached.

160408-09_NGC 2567
NGC 2567 observed with 3” refractor.

Final thoughts

So, that was my fourth and last night observing of my 2nd Tenerife observing trip! During the trip, I made in total 31 observations during four nights. Objects that I observed, Included fro example Messier 68 and 83, NGC 5128, 5139, 2477, 3372 and 2237+2244. During the trip I was also able to spot the northernmost part of the Southern Cross and I also spotted alpha Centauri, which is the nearest stur to us after Sun. I also finished observing Messier catalogue and photographed the Milky way.

I was doing all of my observations in the same spot every night. The spot was called El Retamar, and it located just outside the caldera in the SW side of the caldera. That was because I had already noticed, that the sky won’t get much darker deeper in the caldera so it doesn’t pay off to drive further, it just takes more time and there is more traffic interference. Observing conditions were good during every night, it was clear during all of my observing nights, but this time it was often very windy. The wind was sometimes very strong, and that was causing problems for my observing attemtps.

After this observing trip I still have 28 Caldwell objects and 20 Hidden Treasures -objects to be observed. Besides that, I still have to observe objects between -62 to -90 from somewhere in southern hemisphere. But that’s going to be hopefully a new trip sometimes in future.

 

Observing on Mt. Teide 7./8.4.2016

Date: 7./8.4.2016
Time: 23:00-02:00 (local time)
Observing site: El Retamar (2100m), Teide N.P., Tenerife, Spain
Instrument: L80/400mm (3” refractor)

NELM: 6.3
SQM: 21.45-21.30
Darkness of the background sky: 1
Seeing: 2
Transparency: 1
Weather: Clear sky, calm in the beginning, gusty, moderate wind in the end, +6 C

Objects observed: NGC 3372, 3293, 3532, 2237 & 2244, 3228, 3621, 5102

The night between 7th and 8th of April 2016 was my third observing night during my second trip to Tenerife. During the night, I was observing again in the same site than during the previous nights. During the night, it was calm in the beginning, but towards the end of the session the wind started rising again.

NGC 3372

When I had arrived my observing site, I realized that constellation of Carina was partly visible below Vela in southern horizon, and that mayby it would be possible to observe some objects in that constellation. I started my trial by finding NGC 3372, the famous Carina nebula. To my surprise, I was able to locate it from the horizon, and even to make a decent observation of the nebula! Of course, the nebula wasn’t visible optimally, but anyway, I was able to observe it. When I was observing it, the altitude of the nebula was only 2 degrees. I made following notes of this observation:

I was surprised that I was able to see The Carina nebula at all from the horizon of Teide! Of course, it was at very low altitude, and only the brightest parts of the nebula were visible. I was able to see two or three separate parts of the nebula. The brightes part appeared as large and bright, triangle -shaped nebulosity, which was already weakly visible without OIII filter, but it becomes well visible with the filter. The long axis of this part of the nebula is in N-S orientation, the tip of the triangle is pointing towards north. in the southern side of the triangle, there is another relativey bright nebulosity. In the W side, there appears to be very weak nebulosity.

160407-08_NGC 3372
NGC 3372 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 3293

As I had now proven to myself, that it is possible to observe some objects in Carina from the horizon of Teide, I went on to to bserve more objects in that constellation. My next stop was NGC 3293, an open cluster in Carina, located less than two degrees NW from Carina nebula. Of this object I wrote following notes:

A small, compact and bright-starred copen cluster, very beautiful!

160407-08_NGC 3293
NGC 3293 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 3532

After having observed that open cluster, there was still one more object for my on my list in Carina. That object was open cluster NGC 3532, located less than three degrees NE from the Carina nebula. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

Very large, bright and rich cluster! The cluster is elongated in shape (long axis in W-E direction). The cluster has pretty even brightness range. The cluster is well detached and somewhat concentrated. The stars weem to be quite faint (may be caused by low altitude), but still this is pretty impressive sight.

160407-08_NGC 3532
NGC 3532 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 2237, 2244

Following object is above horizon also in Finland, but Finnish winter conditions often make observing this object very difficult. This object is NGC 2237, the famous Rosette -nebula. There is also an open cluster associated with the nebula, known as NGC 2244. This object is extensive and very large roughly a ring- or donut -shaped nebula around NGC 2244, and ideally the sky should be pretty dark if one is about to otbserve this nebula. In Finland in wintertime the sky usually doesn’t get dark enough, because there is snow on the ground reflecting light to the sky. But its’ different thing in Tenerife, where the sky was dark! That’s why I decided this object from Tenerife instead of Finland. Here are my notes of my observation:

Very large and faint, ring-shaoed nebula (NGC 2237) surrounding open cluster NGC 2244. The westernmost half of the nebula is most obvious one, other parts are fainter. The nebula becomes visible with OIII filter and averted vision.

160407-08_NGC 2237, 2244
NGC 2237, 2244 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 3228

After compliting my observation of the Rosette -nebula, I went on to constellation of Vela to observe an open cluster NGC 3228. This cluster is located less than 5 degrees SW from mu Velorum. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

A rather small, pretty faint-starred and compact open cluster.

160407-08_NGC 3228
NGC 3228 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 3621

My next object was NGC 3621, a very faint nearly edge on -galaxy in Hydra. This galaxy is located 3 degrees SW from xi Hydrae. Of this galaxy, I wrote following notes:

A very faint, edge on galaxy, long axis in NW-SE direction, no structure visible.

160407-08_NGC 3621
NGC 3621 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 5102

The last object for this night was NGC 5102, a lenticular galaxy in Centaurus, just 18′ ENE from iota Centauri. Of this object I wrote following notes:

A small, faint edge on-galaxy, the galaxy has a pretty bright core, best visible with averted vision.

160407-08_NGC 5102
NGC 5102 observed with 3” refractor.

So, this was my third observing night on Mt. Teide during my second observing trip.

Observing on Mt. Teide 5./6.4.2016

Date: 5./6.4.2016
Time: 03:45-07:00 (local time)
Observing site: El Retamar (2100m), Teide N.P., Tenerife, Spain
Instrument: L80/400mm (3” refractor)

NELM: 6.6 – 6.2
SQM: 21.45-20.95
Darkness of the background sky: 1-3
Seeing: 3
Transparency: 1
Weather: Clear sky, fresh, gusty breeze, +8 – +9 C

Objects observed: NGC 5662, 6124, 5986, 6397, 6193 and 6352

During the second night of observing during my 2. trip to Tenerife, I woke up at 2am and drove up to Mt. Teide to observe the morning sky and Milky way!

I arrived at my observing place around 3am, and it was very, very windy up the mountain! The wind was very gusty, on-off wind, at times it was totally calm but soon another gust came and I had to hold on all the papers to prevent wind from throwing them all over! That was quite problematic! Even though the wind was a nuisance, I was still able to make 6 visual observations and to take some wide angle photos of the Milky way!

NGC 5662

My first object of this morning was NGC 5662, an open cluster in Centaurus. This object is located in southern Centaurus, roughly 4 degrees from alpha Centauri to north. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

A small, rather poor open cluster, pretty large brightness range, not very concentrated, well detached from background

160405-06_NGC 5662
NGC 5662 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 6124

After having observed that open cluster in Centaurus, I went on to Scorpius to observe another open cluster! This cluster is NGC 6124, which is located in southern Scorpius, about 6 degrees from zeta Scorpi to NW. I wrote following notes of this object:

Large and very beatiful and rich open cluster, the cluster is well concentrated and well detached from it’s background.

160405-06_NGC 6124
NGC 6124 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 5986

From Scorpius I went on to it’s western neighbour constellation Lupus to observe a globular cluster that is residing in the constellation. This globular cluster is NGC 5986, which is located about 8 degrees NW from NGC 6124. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

Pretty bright globular cluster, not resolved but it brightens slightly towards the core. Easy!

160405-06_NGC 5986
NGC 5986 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 6397

After observing that globular cluster in Lupus, I went on to observe yet another planetary nebula, this in in southern neighbour of Scorpius, in the constellation of Ara! NGC 6397 is a large and bright globular cluster, it equals M13 in size (both are about 25′ in diameter) that is often considered to be The Great Cluster, at least for us living in the northern latitudes. This was very easy to find with the main asterism of Ara, it is located 4 degrees SE from alpha Arae. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

Large, bright globuar cluster, not resolved, brightens slightly towards the core.

160405-06_NGC 6397
NGC 6397 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 6193

After having observed that great globular cluster, I had yet another object on my list in Ara. That object was NGC 6193, an open cluster located in the westernmost part of the constellation near Ara-Norma border. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

Very small and compact cluster, easily overlooked with this kind of RTF -telescope.

160405-06_NGC 6193
NGC 6193 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 6352

After having observed that small open cluster, I still had one more object for observing in Ara, although morning twilight had already started making the sky lighter. That obbject was NGC 6352, yet another globular cluster in Ara. This cluster is located less than two degrees NW from alpha Arae. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

A small, rather faint globular cluster, not resolved

160405-06_NGC 6352
NGC 6352 observed with 3” refractor.

Milky way

Milky way is best visible in the morning in this time of the year. I had taken my camera (Canon EOS 1100D) and couple of wide angle lenses with me to Tenerife and I also bought one of those gorilla pods for a small miniature travel tripod. I supported the camera+8mm Samyang fish eye -lens+gorillapod -combination on some rocks on the ground and took some shots of the Milky way.

I think the Milky way was stunning, but it is easy to see some light pollution from the tourist areas of Los Cristianos-Las Americas in the lower part of the photo. From that photo you can also get some general idea about my observing place. It is a place that has practically zero horizon to the south, only some isolated trees are rising to few degrees, but they aren’t blocking the view and it is easy to move the telescope to get a clear view.

_MG_9300_edit
Milky way photographed in the morning of 6th of April with Canon EOS 1100D and Samyang 8mm fish eye -lens. Exposure time: 30s.

Observing on Mt. Teide, 4./5.4.2016

Date: 4./5.4.2016
Time: 21:45-03:00 (local time)
Observing site: El Retamar (2100m), Teide N.P., Tenerife, Spain
Instrument: L80/400mm (3” refractor)

NELM: 6.6
SQM: 21.22-21.45
Darkness of the background sky: 1
Seeing: 2
Transparency: 1
Weather: Clear sky, calm/light wind, +8 – +4 C

Objects observed: Messier 68, 83, NGC 1851, 2477, 3132, 3201, 5128, 5139, 4945, 5286, 4755, 5694 and IC 2391

During my first observing night of my 2nd Tenerife observing trip, I was able to observe in really good conditions and calm weather on Mt. Teide! I also had very productive observing session that night, I made 13 observations in total!

So this time it was mostly calm, and temperature was comfortably 8 to 4 C -degrees above zero! This time I had decided that I won’t drive further to the caldera, because the conditions don’t seem to differ much when compared with the outer parts of the caldera. During this 2nd observing trip, I stayed every night at my El Retamar observing site just outside the actual caldera in the SW side of the caldera, just at the border of the national park. That place was closest good observing spot for me from my hotel. In this place I had a zero horizon to south and car headlights were disturbing as little as possible.

NGC 1851

I started my night by observing NGC 1851, which is a globular cluster in Columba. The cluster is located in SW corner of the constellation, 5 degrees SW from epsilon Columbae. When I was observing this globular cluster, it was already setting and it was at very low altitude in western horizon. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

A small, pretty bright globular cluster, the cluster gets clearly brighter towards the core, the cluster is not resolved into stars.

160404-05_NGC 1851
NGC 1851 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 2477

My next stop was NGC 2477, an open cluster in Puppis. This cluster is located 2,5 degrees from zeta Puppis to NW. This is very rich and concentrated cluster, but with my modest instrument, it appeared quite modest. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

A rather small, compact and pretty faint open cluster, the cluster is well detached and concentrated towards the center. The cluster appears to be rich, the cluster is mostly visible as a starglow.

160404-05_NGC 2477
NGC 2477 observed with 3” refractor.

IC 2391

From Puppis I continued my journey to the neighbouring constellation known as Vela. In this constellation, my first object was IC 2391, also known as Omicron Velorum cluster. This is a large and scattered cluster concentrated around star omicron Velorum. It is located less than two degrees NW from delta Velorum. My notes from this observation are as follows:

Large, beautiful and bright-starred cluster, moderately rich, well detached, not very concentrated.

160404-05_IC 2391
IC 2391 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 3132

My next object is also an object in Vela, this time not an open cluster but a planetary nebula. NGC 3132 is a large and bright planetary nebula in northernmost part of Vela, just at the Vela-Antlia border. This object is also known as Eight Burst Nebula or Southern Ring Nebula. Because I didn’t have powerful enough instrument, I wasn’t able to see any fine structure or details in this object. But anyway, my notes are as follows:

A planetary nebula, that appears to be a rather large one, because I was able to see it non-stellar with this small aperture instrument. The nebula was visible as a small, non-stellar bright disk.

160404-05_NGC 3132
NGC 3132 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 3201

Before leaving Vela for now, I had one more object in this constellation to observe! This object was NGC 3201, a globular cluster in eastern part of the constellation. This object is located 6 degrees NW from mu Velorum. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

Large, bright globular cluster, not resolved, gets slightly brighter towards the core.

160404-05_NGC 3201
NGC 3201 observed with 3” refractor.

Messier 68

My next object is the 2nd las Messier object, that I still hadn’t observed before this trip. This object was Messier 68 in southern part of the constellation of Hydra. This globular cluster is located below the constellation of Corvus, 3,5 degrees SE fom beta Corvi. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

Large and bright globular cluster, not resolved, brightens towards the core.

160404-05_Messier 68
Messier 68 observed with 3” refractor.

Messier 83

After having observed Messier 68, I still had one more Messier object to be observed, and then I would have finished observing Messier catalogue! That very last missing Messier object for me was Messier 83 in southernmost part of Hydra. This spiral galaxy is located just at the Hydra-Centaurus border, 7 degrees SW from pi Hydrae, a star that is marking the tip of the tail of Hydra. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

Large and bright, almost face-on galaxy, the galaxy has a bright, almost stellar core, otherwise no structure visible

160404-05_Messier 83
Messier 83 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 5128

Yey, and there it is, I had dinally completed observing Messier catalogue! After having completed Messier catalogue, I went on further south into the starry realms of the constellation of Centaurus. In Centaurus, my first object was NGC 5128. NGC 5128 is also known as Kentaurus A, which is a large, elliptic galaxy, that has a dark dust lane cutting the object in half. This is one of the most famous deep sky objects in the whole sky, and it is also known as a radio object. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

Large, pretty faint galaxy, a little bit oval shaped (long axis in SW-NE direction), the dark dust lane was quite weakly visible with averted vision.

160404-05_NGC 5128
NGC 5128 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 5139

After observing Kentaurus A, I went on to observe an object, that is known as the largest globular cluster in Milky way! This object is NGC 5139, also known as Omega Centauri! It is very large globular cluster, and it’s apparent diameter is about 30′, which roughly equals the diameter of full Moon! Of this object, I wrote following notes:

Very large and very bright globular cluster! The cluster is not resolved, but it appears weakly granular. The cluster brightens slightly towards the core. The object was an easy naked eye -sight, and it was stunning already through the finderscope! Really magnificent object!

160404-05_NGC 5139
NGC 5139 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 4945

Also my next object is located in Centaurus. NGC 4945 is a thin, edge on -galaxy located 4 degrees east from gamma Centauri. This object is pretty faint for my modest instrument (9,3 magnitudes, surface brightness 13,6 magnitudes), and it was a little bit challenging to observe, but nevertheless, I was able to observe it:

Very faint and thin edge on galaxy (long axis in W-E direction), the galaxy is visible weakly with averted vision and sweeping.

160404-05_NGC 4945
NGC 4945 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 5286

After that thin galaxy, I stayed in Centaurus. My next objec was NGC 5286, a globular cluster roughly two degrees NE from epsilon Centauri. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

A small and pretty faint globular cluster, brightens towards the core, not resolved.

160404-05_NGC 5286
NGC 5286 observed with 3” refractor

NGC 4755

After having observed that globular cluster, I was about to leave Centaurus for tonight. At this time, I noticed that the constellation of Southern cross was already visible at the southern horizon! Teide is actually little bit too north after all, because for example the southernmost parts of Centaurus are below horizon and also the southernmost star of Southern cross is below horizon. But nevertheless, the three northernmost stars of the Cross were now above horizon! When seeing the stars of this legendary and famous constellation, I couldn’t resist temptation of trying to actually observe something from the Cross! I noticed that the famous Jewelbox -cluster was just barely above horizon (it’s elevation was only about 1 degree!), so I tried to observe it! It was visible poorly because of very low altitude, but nevertheless, I was able to observe it! My notes of this observation are as follows:

The Jewelbox cluster! The cluster was very weakly visible because of very low altitude, but to my surprise, I was at least able to see the cluster from horizon of Teide! Only the brightest stars of the cluster were visible.

160404-05_NGC 4755
NGC 4755 observed with 3” refractor.

NGC 5694

After having a peek on the famous Southern Cross, I went on to have yet another stop in the constellation of Hydra.In the easternmost part of Hydra, there is a small globular cluster, NGC 5694. It is located 5,5 degrees WE from sigma Librae and 7,5 degrees E from pi Hydrae. Of this object I wrote following notes:

A small and faint globular cluster, gets brighter towards the core, not resolved

160404-05_NGC 5694
NGC 5694 observed with 3” refractor.

So, that was my first night of observing during my 2nd Teide observing trip! After having finished observing, I still was admiring the beauty of the southern skies before heading down to my hotel for a sleep.