Observing 28./29.11.2016 in Ulvila Observatory

Date: 28./19.11.2016
Time: 23:15-00:45
Observing site: Ulvila Observatory, Finland
Instrument: C280/2750 mm (11” Catadioptric)

NELM: 6.2
SQM: 20.36 – 20.41
Darkness of the background sky: 3
Seeing: 2
Transparency: –
Weather: Clear sky, calm, -1C to -4C

Objects observed: NGC 1084, 1400, 1407 and 1788

During November 2016, I was able to do observing once. That happened in late November, in the night between 28th and 29th of November 2016. Then I went observing to Ulvila Observatory. During the night, I observed four objects in total.

NGC 1084

My first object of this session, was NGC 1084, a galaxy in the constellation of Eridanus. This galaxy is located in the westernmost part of Eridanus, just at the boundary to Cetus. The galaxy can be located when moving 3 degrees NW from eta Eridani. Of this galaxy, I wrote as follows:

@165x, pretty bright galaxy, even brightness distribution, gets weakly brighter towards the core, strongly elongated, long axis in SW-NE -direction.

161128-29_ngc-1084
NGC 1084 observed with 11” Catadioptric

NGC 1400

My next object for this session was NGC 1400, yet another galaxy in Eridanus.It can be located roughly 7 degrees SW from gamma Eridani. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

@165x, this galaxy appeared as a faint, shapeless, diffuse glow, the galaxy has a rather bright, almost stellar core.

161128-29_ngc-1400
NGC 1400 observed with 11” Catadioptric

NGC 1407

My third object of the night was also a galaxy in Eridanus. This galaxy is located very close to NGC 1400, only 11′ NE from it. These two galaxies fit very well in the same field even with moderate power. Of this galaxy, I wrote followig notes:

@165x, this galaxy appeared as a rather small, relatively faint glow of light that is elongated in NW-SE -direction. The galaxy has rather bright, almost stellar core.

161128-29_ngc-1407
NGC 1407 observed with 11” Catadioptric

NGC 1788

My fourth and last object for this session was NGC 1788, a small reflection nebula in Orion. This nebula is located near the boundary to Eridanus, and it can be located for example when moving about 2 degrees north from beta Eridani. Of this object, I made following notes:

@165x, a small reflecting nebula in Orion, the nebula appeared as a faint, diffuse and shapeless glow of light. There is a 10th magnitude star immediately NW of the nebula. This is perhaps the star that is illuminating the nebula? The nebula is actually quite easy!

161128-29_ngc-1788
NGC 1788 observed with 11” Catadioptric

So, that was my only observing session in November. November was quite cloudy month, so I didn’t got more observing opportunities. Next I’m going to be blogging about my observations in December 2016. Stay tuned for more posts!

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Observing 5./6.10.2016 in Koski, Kullaa

Date: 5./6.10.2016
Time: 21:15-23:15
Observing site: Koski, Kullaa, Finland
Instrument: N250/1200 mm (10” Newton)

NELM: 6.6
SQM: 20.82 – 21.11
Darkness of the background sky: 2 – 1
Seeing: 2
Transparency: –
Weather: Clear sky, light breeze, some high clouds, +9 to -1C

Objects observed: IC 4997, NGC 3610, 3613, 3619, 5557

During Autumn 2016 I was on a quest to find a reasonably good dark sky -obsrving site near my home in Ulvila, Satakunta region, Finland. During the night between 5th and 6th of October 2016, I went on to check another potential dark sky site. This site is located in Kullaa, eastern part of Ulvila municipality near village of Koski. This place seems to be yet another small gravel quarry. The place is only 30 minutes from my home in Ulvila, so it is quite easy to go there when I want to do some observing under darker sky. The sky there is darker than for example in Ulvila observatory, but perhaps not as dark as in Saarijärvi, Lavia. Nevertheless, it should be a reasonably good option for a dark sky site!

IC 4997

During this session, I made 5 observations. My first object was IC 4997, a small but bright planetary nebula in the constellation of Sagitta. It is located in the easternmost corner of Sagitta constellation, just at the boundary to Delphinus. It can be found when moving for example 5 degrees SE from eta Sagittae. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

@120x, a very small planetary nebula, that appears stellar at all powers. The nebula is relatively bright, strong OIII response.

161005-06_ic-4997
IC 4997 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 3610

My second object during the night was NGC 3610, a galaxy in Ursa major. This galaxy can be located within the Big Dipper, for example when moving 3,5 degrees SE from alpha Ursae majoris. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

@120x, a small, relatively bright galaxy, the galaxy has an almost stellar and bright core.

161005-06_ngc-3610
NGC 3610 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 3613

My next object was yet another galaxy in Ursa major. This galaxy is located very close to NGC 3610, it can be located just 50′ south of NGC 3610. Of this galaxy, I wrote as follows:

@120x. a small, relatively bright galaxy, the galaxy has a pretty bright core, the galaxy is elongated, long axis is in W-E orientation.

161005-06_ngc-3613
NGC 3613 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 3619

After having observed two galaxies in Ursa major, I still had one galaxy in this constellation on my list for tonight. This galaxy was NGC 3619, which is actually residing in the same field with NGC 3613. It is located only 15′ SE from NGC 3613. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

@120x, a faint and small galaxy, the galaxy has even brightness distribution, and it possibly appears to have a small and faint stellar core. The galaxy seems to be slightly elliptical in shape, long axis of the galaxy appears to be in SW-NE orientation.

161005-06_ngc-3619
NGC 3619 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 5557

My fifth and last object for this night was NGC 5557, a galaxy located in the constellation of Bootes. It can be found when moving about 3 degrees SW from gamma Bootis. Of this galaxy, I wrote following lines:

@120x, a faint and roundish galaxy, even brightness distribution, best visible with averted vision and sweeping.

161005-06_ngc-5557
NGC 5557 observed with 10” Newton

So that was my last observing session in October. In late September/early October we had a long period of clear skies here in Finland. During late September and early October, I was making observations during six nights in a row! 5/6 of these night were dedicated to deep sky observing, and during one night I just made quick routine variable star observations.

Observing 4./5.10.2016 in Ulvila Observatory

Date: 4./5.10.2016
Time: 00:00-01:00
Observing site: Ulvila Observatory, Finland
Instrument: N280/2750 mm (11” Catadioptric)

NELM: 6.0
SQM: 20.59
Darkness of the background sky: 3
Seeing: 2
Transparency: –
Weather: Clear sky, calm, +3C

Objects observed: PK 80-6.1

During the night between 4th and 5th of October 2016, I was at Ulvila Observatory, where the weekly meeting of Porin Karhunvartijat was organised. After the meeting, I stayed at the Observatory with one of the newer members, and I assisted her to take some astrophotos (even though I’m not an astrophotograhper myself! :D). When she had taken her photos, and she had left home, I still stayed at the Observatory, and I tried to make some observations.

PK 80-6.1 (The Egg nebula)

This time I was quite tired, but still I was able to do one observation. This time I observed PK 80-6.1, which is a small, bipolar planetary nebula in Cygnus. It is located about 4 degrees NE from epsilon Cygni. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

@280x, a very small planetary nebula, moderately bright, the nebula has two lobes, long axis in N-S orientation. Northernmost lobe appears to be brighter than the southern lobe. Poor OIII response.

161004-05_pk-80-6-1
PK 80-6.1 observed with 11” Catadioptric

So, this was my only observation during this short session. I was still able to have one more session in October 2016. I will soon publish a post regarding that session, stay tuned for more posts!

 

Observing 3./4.10.2016 in Saarijärvi, Lavia

Date: 3./4.10.2016
Time: 23:00-00:30
Observing site: Saarijärvi, Lavia, Finland
Instrument: N250/1200 mm (10” Newton)

NELM: 6.6
SQM: 21.12 – 21.26
Darkness of the background sky: 1
Seeing: 2
Transparency: –
Weather: Clear sky, moderate breeze, +4C to +2C, Aurora in the northern sky

Objects observed: NGC 5982, 1961, 5322, 5631, 5676 and 5689

Since I moved back to Ulvila in August 2016, I have been looking for a decent dark sky observing site here in Satakunta region. During the night between 3rd and 4th of October 2016, I was looking for a dark observing place in eastern Satakunta region, in Lavia which is part of Pori municipality. There in Lavia, I found a small gravel quarry near village of Saarijärvi. I stayed there for my observing session, and during the session, I was able to do 6 observations. This observing site seems to be pretty dark, and it takes 50 minutes to drive there. My maximum limit for driving time to my observing site is around one hour. So this place is still at acceptable distance. In terms of darkness of the sky, this place appears to be comparable with my Stormälö observing site in Parainen. I still have visited this Saarijärvi place only once, and I still need more data to make better conclusions.

NGC 5981, 5982, 5985

My first object of the session was a trio of galaxies: NGC 5981, NGC 5982, and 5985. This galaxy trio is located in Draco, less than two degrees NE from iota Draconis. All three galaxies fit easily in the same field with moderate magnification. Together these three galaxies are know as Draco Trio or Draco Group. This trio has not been catalogued as a compact galaxy cluster, but all of them are roughly at same distance from us, they reside about 100 million light years from Earth. My primary target in this trio was NGC 5982, which is one of the Herschel 400 -objects, but as a by-product I was able to observe also NGC 5981 and 5985. Of this trio, I wrote following notes:

@120x, NGC 5981: three galaxies in a row, NGC 5981 is the westernmost of them. This galaxy appeared as a thin, faint and elongated object, that apparently is in edge on -orientation, long axis of the galaxy is in NW-SE -orientation. NGC 5982: the galaxy in the middle, it appeared as a small, bright galaxy with bright core, roundish in shape, long axis in NW-SE -orientation. NGC 5985: the third galaxy in the row, the easternmost of them all. This galaxy appeared as a faint, elliptical, homogenous patch of light, no details visible. This galaxy is apparently the faintest of these three galaxies. It’s difficult to say anything about the orientation of this galaxy.

161003-04_ngc-5982
NGC 5981, 5982 and 5985 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 1961

My next target was NGC 1961, a galaxy in Camelopardalis. This galaxy is located in rather empty region of the sky, it can be found when moving roughly 5,5 degrees NE from alpha Camelopardalis. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

@120x, this galaxy appeared as a roundish, faint, homogenous and diffuse patch of light, no details visible.

161003-04_ngc-1961
NGC 1961 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 5322

The third object for me during this night was NGC 5322, a galaxy located in the constellation of Ursa major. This object can be found about 6 degrees NE from Mizar (zeta Uma). Of this galaxy, I wrote following notes:

@120x, a small, bright galaxy with bright and compact core, the galaxy is elliptical in shape, long axis in W-E -orientation, easy one!

161003-04_ngc-5322
NGC 5322 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 5631

My fourth object for the session wa NGC 5631, a galaxy located in easternmost part of Ursa major, just at the boundary to Draco. The galaxy can be found for example when mving about 9 degrees ENE from Mizar. Of this object, I wrote as follows:

@120x, a small, moderately bright galaxy with pretty bright and compact core. The galaxy is slightly oval-shaped, long axis of the galaxy is in N-S orientation.

161003-04_ngc-5631
NGC 5631 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 5676

My second last object for this session was NGC 5676, a galaxy located in northern part of the constellation of Bootes. The galaxy can be found about 3 degrees SE from kappa Bootis. Of this galaxy, I wrote as follows:

@120x, a small and faint galaxy, the galaxy appears as a diffuse, homogenous, featureless patch of dim light, the galaxy is oval-shaped with long axis in W-E orientation. No details visible.

161003-04_ngc-5676
NGC 5676 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 5689

The sixth and last object for me during this session was NGC 5689, yet another galaxy in Bootes. This galaxy is located just 50′ SE from NGC 5676. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

@120x, a small and faint galaxy, the galaxy has a core that is slightly brighter than rest of the galaxy, oval-shaped, long axis in W-E -orientation.

161003-04_ngc-5689
NGC 5689 observed with 10” Newton

So, that was my second observing session during October 2016. I will soon publish a post about my next observing session during October, so stay tuned for more posts!

Observing 1./2.10.2016 in Stormälö

Date: 1./2.10.2016
Time: 22:30-01:15
Observing site: Stormälö, Parainen, Finland
Instrument: N250/1200 mm (10” Newton)

NELM: 6.6
SQM: 20.8 – 21.15
Darkness of the background sky: from 2 to 1 (a scale from 1 to 5, 1 best, 5 worst)
Seeing: 2
Transparency: from 2 to 1 (a scale from 1 to 5, 1 best, 5 worst)
Weather: In the beginning some high clouds, then the sky cleared up, calm, humid air, from +5C to +1C

Objects observed: NGC 3147, 3982, 3998, Minkowski 1-92, NGC 4036, 4041 and 5907

During the night between 1st and 2nd of October 2016, I was able to have a second observing session in a row! During this session, I was also observig in Stomälö, Parainen. During this night, it was totally calm, and because of this humidity of air was causing problems. This night was also much colder than previous night, and in the beginning of the session there were some high clouds in the sky. Nevertheless, I was anyway able to observe 7 new objects in total!

NGC 3147

My first object of this night was NGC 3147, a galaxy located in the westernmost part of Draco, just at the boundary to Ursa major. This galaxy can be found 7 degrees NW from lambd Draconis. About this object, I wrote following notes:

@120x, a small galaxy, pretty bright, rather round in shape, the brightness of the galaxy increases slightly towards the core, the core appears to be nearly stellar. This galaxy is rather easy object with 120x magnification.

161001-02_ngc-3147
NGC 3147 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 3982

The second object for me during the night was NGC 3982, a galaxy located in Ursa major. This galaxy resides in the famou Big Dipper, and it can be found when moving just 1,5 degrees north from gamma Ursae majoris. Of this object, I wrote as follows:

@120x, this galaxy appeared as a faint, diffuse, featureless glow with even brightness distribution. No details visible.

161001-02_ngc-3982
NGC 3982 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 3998

My next object was NGC 3998, yet another galaxy in Big Dipper. This galaxy is very close to the previous one, it is located only 24′ north from NGC 3982. Of this object, I wrote following lines:

@120x, a small, compact and bright galaxy, the galaxy has a bright, stellar core. The galaxy appears to be round in shape.

161001-02_ngc-3998
NGC 3998 observed with 10” Newton

Minkowski 1-92

After having observed two galaxies in Big Dipper, I aimed my telescope to southwestern sky, where the celestial Cygnus was flying along the starry paths of the Milky Way! There my target this time was Minkowski 1-92, a famous planetary nebula also known as the “Footprint nebula”. It is a two-lobed bipolar nebula, whose shape resembles a figure of a footprint. It is a very small object, and ideally you would use much bigger instrument for observig it. But nevertheless, I wrote following notes of my observation:

@240x, this planetary nebula appeared as a very small, faint and practically stellar object. No details visible, poor OIII response.

161001-02_minkowski-1-92
Minkowski 1-92 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 4036

After briefly visiting Cygnus for observing Minkowski 1-92, it was time for me to return to the northern sky, where the celestial bears are dwelling! Now I was there after NGC 4036, a galaxy in northen part of Ursa major. It can be found for example moving 6 edegrees east from alpha Ursae majoris. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

@120x, a small, bright galaxy with rather bright, almost stellar core, strongly elongated in shape, long axis in W-W orientation, the galaxy appears to be in edge on -orientation.

161001-02_ngc-4036
NGC 4036 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 4041

After having observed NGC 4036, I observed NGC 4041, another galaxy, that is residing very close to NGC 4036. Actually the galaxies are so close to each other, that they easily fit in the same field with low power. About this object I wrote as follows:

@120x, a small and faint galaxy, the galaxy gets slowly brighter towards the core, roundish in shape.

161001-02_ngc-4041
NGC 4041 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 5907

My seventh and last object for this session was NGC 5907, a great galaxy in the constellation of Draco. This galaxy that is visible in edge on -orientation to us, is famous for its flat and elongated shape. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

@120x, a faint, very thin and strongly elongated edge on -galaxy, the galaxy gets slowly brighter towards the core, the galaxy appears to have a core that is slightly brighter than the rest of the galaxy. The galaxy is best visible with averted vision and sweeping, the long axis of the galaxy is in NW-SE -orientation.

161001-02_ngc-5907
NGC 5907 observed with 10” Newton

So, that was my first observing session in October 2016. I was still able to have some more observing session during this month, so keep tuned for more observing session reports!

Observing 30.9./1.10.2016 in Stormälö

Date: 30.9./1.10.2016
Time: 22:00-02:15
Observing site: Stormälö, Parainen, Finland
Instrument: N250/1200 mm (10” Newton)

NELM: 6.6
SQM: 21.03 – 21.17
Darkness of the background sky: 1
Seeing: 2
Transparency: –
Weather: Clear sky, fresh breeze, dry air, +11C – +9C

Objects observed: NGC 6207, 6247, 7217, 7448, 488, 524, 2742A and 2768

I got yet another observing chance in the very end of September, when the sky was clear and Moon was not interfering. During the night between 30.9. and 1.10.2016 I drove to my Stormälö observing site in Parainen, Finland. During the night the sky was clear, but it was very windy! The wind was causing slight problems, but on the other hand, because of it, the air was dry and there weren’t any humidity problems during this night, which is actually quite exceptional here in Finland!

NGC 6207

I started my observing session by observing NGC 6207, a galaxy in the vicinity of Messier 13, the Great Cluster of Hercules. This galaxy is located only 0,5 degrees NE from the cluster. Of this object I wrote following notes:

@120x a rather small, elongated galaxy, long axis in SW-NE -direction, the galaxy has a bright, almost stellar core. The galaxy seems to be in edge on -position. Very close to Messier 13!

160930-1001_ngc-6207
NGC 6207 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 6426

After having observed NGC 6207, I aimed my scope to NGC 6426, a globular cluster located in Ophiuchus, just 1,5 degrees SSE from beta Ophiuchi. Of this object, I wrote as follows:

@71x a small and faint globular cluster, appears as a diffuse nebulous patch. The brightness distribution of the cluster appears to be pretty even. The object is best visible with averted vision and sweeping.

160930-1001_ngc-6426
NGC 6426 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 7217

My third object of this night was NGC 7217, a galaxy located in the northwestern corner of Pegasus, nearly 8 degrees W from eta Pegasi. Of this object I wrote following notes:

@120x, a small but bright and compact galaxy with bright core. The galaxy appears to be round in shape. The galaxy was already visible with 31x magnification.

160930-1001_ngc-7217
NGC 7217 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 7448

My fourth object of the night, NGC 7448, was actually an unplanned duplicate observation. I had already observed this in early September in Leistilänjärvi, but for some reason I just didn’t remember, that I had observed it recently. Anyway, here are my notes of this object from this session:

@120x, a galaxy that is elongated in NW-SE -direction, it is apparently in edge on -position, the galaxy has even light distribution and it is pretty bright and easy.

160930-1001_ngc-7448
NGC 7448 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 488

My fifth object of this rather productive night was NGC 488, a galaxy located 4 degrees SW from mu Piscium. Of this object, I wrote:

@120x, a small, moderately bright galaxy. The galaxy appeared as a round, nebulous patch, that gets slightly brighter towards center. The galaxy is slightly elongated with long axis in NW-SE -direction

160930-1001_ngc-488
NGC 488 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 524

After having observed NGC 488, I went on to observe NGC 524, yet another galaxy in Pisces. This galaxy is located roughly 3,5 degrees NW from mu Piscium. This object inspired me to write following notes:

@120x, a small galaxy, that appears as a roundish, nebulous patch, relatively bright, gets slowly brighter towards the core, the core is slightly diffuse, non-stellar

160930-1001_ngc-524
NGC 524 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 2742A

Last two of my objects of this session were located in the opposite direction of the sky, these last two objects reside in Ursa major, the Great Bear of the northern sky. The second last object of my session was NGC 2742A, a galaxy located in western part of Ursa major, 6 degrees NW from upsilon Ursa majoris. Of this object I wrote as follows:

@120x, this galaxy appeared as a very faint, diffuse patch of light, the galaxy seems to be elongated with long axis in NW-SE -orientation, best with averted vision and sweeping, low surface brightness, even brightness distribution, not visible with 31x magnification

160930-1001_ngc-2742
NGC 2742A observed with 10” Newton

NGC 2768

My last object of this night was NGC 2768, located 5 degrees W from upsilon Uma and 2 degrees south of NGC 2742A. Of this object I wrote following lines:

@120x, a pretty bright galaxy, elongated in W-E -direction, gets moderately brighter towards the core, core non-stellar, pretty easy object, visible already with 31x.

160930-1001_ngc-2768
NGC 2768 observed with 10” Newton

So these were my observations in September 2016. Stay tuned for more observation reports!