Observing 1./2.9.2016 in Leistilänjärvi

Date: 01./02.09.2016
Time: 00:00-02:00
Observing site: Leistilänjärvi, Nakkila, Finland
Instrument: N250/1200 mm (10” Newton)

NELM: 6.6
SQM: 20.8 – 20.76
Darkness of the background sky: 2
Seeing: 2
Transparency: –
Weather: Clear sky, calm, Aurora arc in northern horizon, +10C – +9C

Objects observed: NGC 1342, 1444 and 7086

During the first night of September, I went again to my Leistilänjärvi -site to do some routine variable star- and deep sky observing. This time it was relatively warm, and conditions were rather good! There was though an Aurora arc in the northern horizon, but it didn’t interfere my observing attempts too much.

NGC 1342

During the night, my first object was NGC 1342, an open cluster located in constellation of Perseus, about 6 degrees SE from beta Persei. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

@50x: a rather easy and obvious open cluster. The cluster is well detached and relatively well concentrated. The cluster has rather large brightness range, and it appears to be moderately rich.

160901-02_ngc-1342
NGC 1342 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 1444

The next object on my list was NGC 1444, a small and compact open cluster also in Perseus. This cluster is located in the northern part of the constellation, about 4 degrees NE from alpha Persei. Of this object, I wrote as follows:

@ 120x: a rather faint-starred, poor open luster, which is dominated by a pair of stars in the cluster. In the cluster, the stars of this pair have considerably large brightness difference.

160901-02_ngc-1444
NGC 1444 observed with 10” Newton

NGC 7086

The third and this time the last object of this observing session was NGC 7086, an open cluster in the constellation of Cygnus. This cluster is located in the northern part of the constellation, 10 degrees NE from Deneb and roughly 8 degreed west from beta Lacertae. Of this object I wrote following notes:

@120x: a rather small and faint open cluster, it appears to e rich, it is well detached and compact and it appears to have rather small brightness range. The visual diameter of the cluster is about 6 arc minutes.

160901-02_ngc-7086
NGC 7086 observed with 10” Newton
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