Noctilucent clouds 27./28.7.2012

Observed phenomena: Noctilucent clouds
Observed NLC forms:

  • I (Veil)
  • IIIa (Waves, short, straight and narrow streaks)
  • IIIb (Wave-like structure with undulations)
  • O (Unusual forms)

Brightness of the NLCs: 3 (clearly visible, standing out sharply against the twilight sky)

Date: 27./28.7.2012
Time: 01:30-03:30
Observing place: Perniö, Salo, Finland
Observing method: Photography
Technical information about photographing equipment: Camera Canon EOS 1100D, lens Canon EF-S 18-55mm IS, Samyang 8mm fish eye

The NLC display of the second night of Cygnus 2013 -convention. This time I noticed the NLC’s @ 01:30 and observed them until 03:30. In the middle of the NLC observing, I observed also variable stars. Tonights display was pretty much similar than last nights. During early night, the NLC’s were at low altitude in the northern sky, but they rose higher later. The colour of the NLC’s was clearly pale blue.

This display was clearly veil (I)+wave (III) -type display. In the early evening, the display was consisted of veil (I) and waves (IIIa and b). The waves were transforming into undefined, turbulent-looking form (O). Later the NLC’s rose higher in the sky towards zenith. In this phase, veil (I) and turbulent forms (O) dominated the display, and only couple of small wave -sets were visible.

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23° upper parhelia 28.7.2012

Observed phenomena: Halo phenomena
Light source: Sun
Origin: High clouds (cirrostratus)
Observed halo forms:

  • 23° upper parhelia

Date: 28.7.2012
Time: 13:50-14:40
Observing place: Perniö, Salo, Finland
Observing method: Photography
Technical information about photographing equipment: Canon EOS 1100D, Canon EF-S 18-55mm IS

I had observed 23° upper parhelia already once 6.7.2012, but I had an opportunity to observe this halo form again 28.7.2012 during the Cygnus -summer meeting of Ursa (the National Astronomical Association of Finland) in Naarila, Perniö, Finland. This time there were several observations of this and other pyramide halos too, so this observation has been confirmed by many other observers!

23° upper parhelia observed in Naarila, Perniö, Finland during the Cygnus -convention of Finnish amateur astronomers
23° upper parhelia observed in Perniö, Salo, Finland 28.7.2012 during the Cygnus -convention of Finnish amateur astronomers

27./28.7.2012 – variable stars and noctilucent clouds

Date: 27./28.7.2012
Time: 01:45-03:30
Observing site: Perniö, Salo, Finland
Instrument: L102/1000mm (4” Refractor), camera: Canon EOS 1100D, lens: Canon EF-S 18-55mm, Samyang 8mm fish eye

NELM: 4,3
SQM: 18,18
Darkness of the background sky: 5
Seeing: 2
Transparency: 2
Weather: Mostly clear sky, light wind, +10 °C, noctilucent clouds in the northern sky

Objects observed: R Cyg (visual)

The starting of this session was delayed also this time because I was observing noctilucent clouds during the early night also this time. The dark enough -time during the nights this time of year is still so short, that there isn’t much time to make any proper observations. That was the case also now. This time I could do one proper observation of a variable star, this time I observed star R Cyg.

Noctilucent clouds 27./28.7.2012, observed in Naarila, Perniö, Finland

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Variable star observations:

Date Time Star Mag. Comp.
27./28.7.2012 02.49 R Cyg 8.3 8.3/9.9

28.7.2012 – testing my new catadioptric teleobjective with the Sun

Date: 28.7.2012
Time: 16:20
Observing site: Perniö, Salo, Finland
Instrument: L102/1000mm (4” Refractor), camera: Canon EOS 1100D, lenses: Canon EF-S 18-55mm IS, Samyang 800 mm catadioptric-teleobjective

Seeing: –
Transparency: –
Weather: Clear sky, warm

Objects observed: Sun (photography)

I was testing my new acquisition, a Samyang 800mm catadioptric teleobjective. I took some shots of the Sun with Canon EOS 1100D with the teleobjective and for comparison, also with L102/1000mm (4” refractor). Below you can see the results. For more in-depth post about the teleobjective, look here.

Noctilucent clouds 26./27.7.2012

Observed phenomena: Noctilucent clouds
Observed NLC forms:

  • I (Veil)
  • IIb (Bands with sharply defined edged)
  • IIIa (Waves, short, straight and narrow streaks)
  • O (Unusual forms)

Brightness of the NLCs: 3 (clearly visible, standing out sharply against the twilight sky)

Date: 26./27.7.2012
Time: 00:25-03:25
Observing place: Perniö, Salo, Finland
Observing method: Photography
Technical information about photographing equipment: Camera Canon EOS 1100D, lens Canon EF-S 18-55mm IS

The NLC display of the first night of Cygnus 2013 -convention. I noticed the NLC’s first time @00:25 at low altitude in northern sky. In This display was clearly band -dominated one. During most of duration of this display, there was a long belt, that remained invariably stable. Between 01.00-02.00 I was observing variable stars, and that’s why there is a hiatus in my observing series. I observed the NLC’s until 03:25.

It is possible to separate two different phases from this display:

00:25- ~01:00 NLC’s at low altitude in northern sky, veil (I) and short bands (IIa), dominant colour creamy white.

02:00-03:25 NLC’s had risen higher, long, horizontal band(s) (IIa) dominating the display with some veil (I) and waves (IIIa). In the end of my observing session, only a long, horizontal band (IIa) is visible. Colour  of the NLC’s in this latter phase was typical pale blue.

26./27.7.2012 – new season has started!

Date: 26./27.7.2012
Time: 02:30-03:10
Observing site: Perniö, Salo, Finland
Instrument: L102/1000mm (4” Refractor), camera: Canon EOS 1100D, lens: Canon EF-S 18-55mm, Samyang 8mm fish eye

NELM: 3,1
SQM: 17,25
Darkness of the background sky: 5
Seeing: –
Transparency: 2
Weather: Mostly clear sky, calm, humid air, +13 °C, noctilucent clouds in the northern sky

Objects observed: R Tri (visual)

The first session of this obsering season! The season starter happened again in the Cygnus -summer meeting of Finnish amateur astronomers. In the early night, I was observing noctilucent clouds, and I started this session when the darkest moment of the night was already over. The nights are still light and short in this time of the year here up north, and this is why I was able to do only one observation. This time the first object observed was star R Tri, whose brightness was 6.6 mag.

Noctilucent clouds 26./27.7.2012, observed in Naarila, Perniö, Finland

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Variable star observations:

Date Time Star Mag. Comp.
26./27.7.2012 02.50 R Tri 6.6 6.7/8.0

A magnificent rainbow observed in Parkano, Finland 22.7.2012

Observed phenomena: Rainbow
Observed rainbow -phenomena:

  • Primary arc
  • Secondary arc
  • Interference arcs with primary arc
  • Alexander’s dark band
  • Rainbow spikes
  • Reflected rainbow

Date: 22.7.2012
Time: 20:23-21:05
Observing place: Parkano, Finland
Observing method: Photography
Technical information about photographing equipment: Canon EOS 1100D, Canon EF-S 18-55mm IS

On 22nd of July I observed a really magnificent rainbow in Parkano, Finland. It all started @ 20:23, when I observed a short sections of rainbow. With the ordinary rainbow, I observed also a short and very faint “extra-rainbow” which was actually a reflected rainbow from the primary arc! It was the very first time for me to observe a reflected rainbow in my life!

A little bit later, @ 20:40, a full and bright primary arc with full secondary arc stretched over the sky of Parkano! Now also Alexander’s dark band and interference arcs with primary arc were visible!

Nice rainbow spikes were visible during the whole display. And when the rainbows itself had already disappeared @ 21:00, the rainbow spikes, or anticrepescular rays, were still visible.

Evolution of this rainbow display

20:23-20.28 – two short sections of primary arc with reflected primary arc
20:28-20:40 two short sections of primary arc
20:40-20:45 full primary arc, full secondary arc, interference arcs with primary arc, Alexanders dark band clearly visible
20:45-21:00 two short sections of primary- and secondary arc, interference arcs with primary arc
21.00-21.05 rainbows had disappeared, anticrepescular rays still visible