Observing 23./24.8.2017 in Ulvila Observatory

Date: 23./24.8.2017
Time: 23:00-01:30
Observing site: Ulvila Observatory, Finland
Instrument: C280/2750 mm (11” Catadioptric)

NELM: –
SQM: 20.66
Darkness of the background sky: 3
Seeing: –
Transparency: –
Weather: Clear sky, calm, no Moon, dry air, +12C

During the night between 23rd and 24th of August 2017, I went observing to Ulvila Observatory. During this night, I was able to observe two objects, both planetary nebulas: NGC 6772 and 6804. During the Night I was at the observatory with Jarkko Suominen. He was photographing The Veil Nebula in Cygnus, and during the night I was able to do couple of visual observations during the breaks of his exposures. Besides my visual observations, I was also participating astrophotography activities with Jarkko that night. A report of the Veil nebula photography session can be found in Taivaanvahti observation database by Ursa Astronomical Association (in Finnish).

NGC 6772

My first target for the night was NGC 6772, a planetary nebula in Aquila, located in SW part of the constellation, about 14 degrees SW from Altair. About this object I wrote following notes:

@165x: This planetary nebula appeared as a roundish, and faint nebulous glow with even brightness distribution. No central star or structure visible. OIII enhanced the view, this nebula doesn’t tolerate magnification very well.

170823-24_NGC 6772
NGC 6772 observed with 11” Catadioptric

 

NGC 6804

My second and last object for this short session was NGC 6804, another planetary nebula in Aquila. This nebula is located ~4 degrees W from Altair. About this stellar remnant I wrote as follows:

@280x: This planetary nebula appeared as a rather small, and pretty bright nebulous patch of light. The shape of the nebula is perhaps slightly elongated. Central star became visible with higher magnification. OIII didn’t do much with this object.

170823-24_NGC 6804
NGC 6804 observed with 11” Catadioptric

So, that was my second, this time very short observing session. I was happy anyway, because I was able to see two new planetary nebulas for me, and both of them were really pretty objects!

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Observing 29./30.3.2017 in Ulvila Observatory

Date: 29./30.3.2017
Time: 22:00-00:30
Observing site: Ulvila Observatory, Finland
Instrument: C280/2750 mm (11” Catadioptric)

NELM: 6.2
SQM: 20.61-20.80
Darkness of the background sky: 3
Seeing: –
Transparency: –
Weather: Clear sky, calm, no Moon, no snow, 0 – -2C, aurora belt/arc in northern sky

Objects observed: NGC 3640, 3641, 3810, 3655, 3900 and 3912

This night was my last observing session in March 2017 and in observing season 2016-2017. During this night, I observed several galaxies in Leo, and I was able to finish Leo constellation in Herschel 400 observing list. During the night, I was observing in Ulvila observatory, and conditions were relatively good in terms of the site.

NGC 3640, 3641

My first stop at my journey in the starry sky during this night was pair of galaxies NGC 3640 and 3641. Of these two, my main target was NGC 3640, an elliptical galaxy located in southern part of Leo. This galaxy can be found when moving ~degrees south from sigma Leo. NGC 3641 is located only 2,5′ SE from 3640. This galaxy is rather faint and small, and it is classified also as an elliptical galaxy. Of these two I wrote following notes:

@165x: two galaxies in the field, NGC 3640 and 3641. NGC 3640 is the brightest and more dominant of these two. NGC 3640 appears as a bright, oval-shaped, diffuse glow of light with bright non-stellar core, long axis in W-E orientation. NGC 3641 appears as a small, roundish, featureless and faint nebulous patch slightly SE from NGC 3640.

170329-30_NGC 3640-3641
NGC 3640 and 3641 observed with 11” Catadioptric

NGC 3810

My next object for this night was NGC 3810, a galaxy located in southern Leo close to Virgo boundary. This galaxy can be located when moving ~4 degrees ENE from iota Leo. This galaxy with beautiful spiral structure has also been photographed by Hubble space telescope. This galaxy is classified as an Sc -type spiral galaxy, and the galaxy has a really nice spiral structure, see for your self! Unfortunately I couldn’t see the spiral structure with my modest instrument. About this galaxy, I wrote as follows:

@165x: this galaxy appeared as a rather faint, roundish and diffuse patch of light, the galaxy has a faint core, which doesn’t stand out much.

170329-30_NGC 3810
NGC 3810 observed with 11” Catadioptric

NGC 3655

My third object for this session was NGC 3655, an Sc -spiral in the rear end of Leo. This galaxy can be located for example by moving ~2,5 degrees NE from theta Leo. About this galaxy, I wrote following notes:

@165x: this galaxy appeared as an elongated, oval-shaped glow, the galaxy has a rather bright core, long axis in N-S orientation.

170329-30_NGC 3655
NGC 3655 observed with 11” Catadioptric

NGC 3900

My fourth object for this night was NGC 3900, a spiral galaxy of type S0-a R, located in north-easternmost corner of Leo, close to Coma Berenices boundary. It can be located for example by moving ~8,5 degrees roughly to west from gamma Com. About this galaxy I write as follows:

@165x: rather bright, oval-shaped, elongated galaxy, rather bright core, long axis in N-S orientation.

170329-30_NGC 3900
NGC 3900 observed with 11” Catadioptric

NGC 3912

My fifth and last object for this session was NGC 3912, a barred spiral galaxy of type SBb, located only ~30′ SSE from NGC 3900. About this galaxy, I wrote as follows:

@165x: this galaxy appears as a faint, diffuse, nebulous and featureless patch of light. This galaxy is elongated and thin, long axis in N-S direction.

170329-30_NGC 3912
NGC 3912 observed with 11” Catadioptric

So, that was it! My last observing session in March 2017 and last in observing season 2016-2017. Now I had finished Leo constellation on Herschel 400, and I could tick off that constellation from the list!

This observing season had been also quite productive, I was able to more than 80 observations during the season! In late season during spring of 2017, I was having quite busy and hectic season again in my life, and that hindered my observing to some extent. I had to terminate the observing season prematurely partially because of that. But all in all, I was quite satisfied with my observing season! I might later publish a more detailed insight to my observing season statistics.

But at least I’m going to keep some time off from observing because of the mandatory summer break that we northern deep sky observers have. The skies are already very light, and it’s only about 3 weeks to summer solstice! Enjoy the summer, and have good time! See you again in Autumn of 2017!

 

 

Observing 28./29.3.2017 in Ulvila Observatory

Date: 28./29.3.2017
Time: 22:00-00:00
Observing site: Ulvila Observatory, Finland
Instrument: C280/2750 mm (11” Catadioptric)

NELM: –
SQM: 20.6
Darkness of the background sky: 3
Seeing: 2
Transparency: –
Weather: Clear sky, calm, no Moon, no snow, 0C, aurora belt/arc in northern sky

Objects observed: NGC 4151, 4156

During this night I was again at Ulvila observatory. During the night, there was again the weekly club meeting of Porin Karhunvartijat. After most people had left, I stayed at the observatory with couple of my astro friends. We were casually observing some common objects, and I was able to do one proper observation. This time I observed NGC 4151 and 4156 in Canes Venatici.

NGC 4151 and 4156

My main target was NGC 4151, a barred spiral galaxy located in Canes Venatici. The object is classified as SBab R. This object is located about 5 degrees SW from beta CVi. In the same field with this galaxy, there was also a smaller and fainter galaxy, NGC 4156. This SBb galaxy is located only 5′ NE from 4151. Of these two I wrote following notes:

@165x: two galaxies in the field: NGC 4151 and 4156. NGC 4151 is the brightest of these two, it is rather bright and slightly oval-shaped, the galaxy has a bright, stellar core. NGC 4156: this galaxy appears as faint, diffuse featureless patch of light.

170328-29_NGC 4151-4156
NGC 4151 and 4156 observed with 11” Catadioptric

After having observed NGC 4151, I had observed every galaxy in Canes Venatici that are listed in Herschel 400!

This observing session was my third in March 2017 and second last in season 2016-2017. So I still had one more observing session before summer break. I’ll write more about that later!

Observing 27./28.3.2017 in Ulvila Observatory

Date: 27./28.3.2017
Time: 22:00-00:00
Observing site: Ulvila Observatory, Finland
Instrument: C280/2750 mm (11” Catadioptric)

NELM: –
SQM: 20.01-20.63
Darkness of the background sky: 3
Seeing: 2
Transparency: –
Weather: Clear to partly cloudy sky, moderate breeze, no Moon, no snow, +4C

Objects observed: NGC 3377, 3412, 3489 and 3593

This night was my second observing night in March 2017. During the night, I was observing in Ulvila observatory. Conditions were pretty average in terms of the site. During the night, I observed four galaxies in Leo, all listed in Herschel 400 observing list.

NGC 3377

My first object for the night was NGC 3377, an elliptical galaxy in Leo located about 6,5 degrees WSW from theta Leo. Messier 95, 96 and 105 aren’t far from this either, this galaxy is located ~1,5 degrees N from M 105. Of this galaxy I wrote following notes:

@165x: rather bright galaxy with bright, almost stellar core. The galaxy is elongated, long axis in SW-NE orientation.

170327-28_NGC 3377
NGC 3377 observed with 11” Catadioptric

NGC 3412

My next target wasn’t far away either, this galaxy was NGC 3412, a barred spiral galaxy of type SB0, located ~1 degree SE from NGC 3377. About this object, I wrote as follows:

@165x: rather bright galaxy, elongated, with bright, almost stellar core. Long axis in NW-SE direction.

170327-28_NGC 3412
NGC 3412 observed with 11” Catadioptric

NGC 3489

My third object for this night was NGC 3489, an SB0-a barred spiral galaxy in Leo, located 2,5 degrees ENE from NGC 3412. I wrote following notes about this object:

@165x: a rather bright, elongated galaxy with bright, almost stellar core. Long axis of the galaxy is in SW-NE orientation.

170327-28_NGC 3489
NGC 3489 observed with 11” Catadioptric

NGC 3593

My fourth and last object for this night was NGC 3593, a lenticular galaxy of type S0-a in Leo constellation. This galaxy is located very close to Messier 65 and 66, it can be found ~1 degree WSW from Messier 65. About this galaxy I wrote as follows:

@165x: an elongated, rather bright and thin galaxy, apparently in edge-on position. Long axis in W-E orientation. Center of the area slightly brighter than outer parts.

170327-28_NGC 3593
NGC 3593 observed with 11” Catadioptric

So, that was my second observing night in March 2017. After this session, I was still able to do observing couple more times before mandatory summer break from observing.

 

Observing 21./22.2.2017 in Ulvila Observatory

Date: 21./22.2.2017
Time: 19:00-23:00
Observing site: Ulvila Observatory, Finland
Instrument: C280/2750 mm (11” Catadioptric)

NELM: 5.7
SQM: 19.85
Darkness of the background sky: 3
Seeing: 2
Transparency: –
Weather: Clear sky, no Moon, snow on the ground, -3C

Objects observed: NGC 5474

During this evening there was the weekly club meeting of Porin Karhunvartijat in Ulvila observatory. Because of this, I wasn’t totally alone, and I could do only one observation. This object was NGC 5474.

NGC 5474

NGC 5474 is a spiral galaxy of type Sc located in Ursa major, very close to famous Messier 101. The galaxy is located only 45′ SE from M101. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

@117x: this galaxy appeared as a very faint, elongated glow, it appears to be elongated, long axis appears to be in SW-NE orientation. Homogenous brightness distribution, no visible core.

170221-22_NGC 5474
NGC 5474 observed with 11” Catadioptric.

So that was my second and last observing session in February 2017. There wasn’t many observing sessions or observations in February, but in March I was observing during several nights and I was able to made quite lot of observations! I’ll be posting more about my observations in March 2017 later!

Observing 19./20.1.2017 in Ulvila Observatory

Date: 19./20.1.2017
Time: 20:15-00:00
Observing site: Ulvila Observatory, Finland
Instrument: C280/2750 mm (11” Catadioptric)

NELM: 5.7
SQM: 19.85-20.05
Darkness of the background sky: 3-4
Seeing: 2
Transparency: –
Weather: Some high clouds in the beginning of the session, later the sky cleared up, fresh breeze, surprisingly warm and dry air, only thin layer of snow on the ground, no Moon, surprisingly good conditions considering the time of year

Objects observed: NGC 2194, 2261, 2024, 2175

This was my first observing session in year 2017. During this session, I made four observations, all observed objects were listed in Herschel 400 list. Conditions were relatively good considering the season.

NGC 2194

My first object of this session was NGC 2194, an open cluster located in northern part of Orion, near Gemini border. The cluster can be located 1,5 degrees SE from xi Ori. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

@117x: faint-starred open cluster, which is moderately detached, the cluster is mostly visible as a starglow, some individual stars were visible.

170119-20_NGC 2194
NGC 2194 observed with 11” Catadioptric

NGC 2261

My second object of this night was NGC 2261, the famous reflecting nebula known as Hubble’s variable nebula. Of course the nebula itself is not variable, but the star illuminating it is. The illuminating star is R Mon, a variable star of type T Tauri, varying from 10 to 12 magnitudes. This nebula is located in Monoceros, very close to famous Cone nebula, and it can be located ~1 degree SW from the nebula. Of this fascinating object I wrote following notes:

@165x: this famous nebula is known as Hubble’s variable nebula, it appeared surprisingly large and bright, the shape is clearly wedge-like or comet-like, the nebula extends northwards from star R Mon. The star R Mon is like the nucleus of the comet, and the nebula is like the tail of the comet. The nebula was easily visible without filters. Nice object!

170119-20_NGC 2261
NGC 2261 observed with 11”Catadioptric

NGC 2024

My third object of this session was very challenging in thse observing conditions, but nevertheless, I decided to give it a try. This object was NGC 2024, also known as Tank Track Nebula, a famous bright nebula in Orion. This nebula is located very close to Alnitak, zeta Ori. About this challenging object I wrote following lines:

@117x: This nebula was poorly visible in these conditions. The nebula appeared as a very faint, diffuse glow of light slightly east from Mintaka. The nebula was weakly visible without filter, UHC filter enhanced the view slightly. The nebula was visible all the time only with averted vision and sweeping.

170119-20_NGC 2024
NGC 2024 observed with 11” Catadioptric

This observation left me hungry for more, and I need to observe this one again in better conditions!

NGC 2174/2175

My fourth and last object for this session was NGC 2174/2175, an open cluster/nebula in northernmost part of Orion, near Gemini border. This cluster can be located ~1,5 degrees ENE from Chi2 Ori. The name of this object is quite ambiguous, and it is not very clear, which designation is for the nebula and which one is for the cluster. The nebula is also widely known as Monkey Head nebula. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

@117x: a rather scattered, poorly concentrated, poor open cluster. The cluster is weakly detached, with OIII filter I suspected very faint nebulosity around the brightest star of the field.

170119-20_NGC 2175
NGC 2175/2174 observed with 11” Catadioptric

So know I had finished this observing session. There were two objects, that left me a little bit unsatisfied because of poor observing conditions. These objects were NGC 2024 and NGC 2174/2175. I need to re-observe these objects during next season!

After this, there was one more observing session in January 2017. More about that later!

 

Observing 28./29.12.2016 in Ulvila Observatory

Date: 28./29.12.2016
Time: 17:30-18:30
Observing site: Ulvila Observatory, Finland
Instrument: C280/2750 mm (11” Catadioptric)

NELM: 6.2
SQM: 20.39
Darkness of the background sky: 3
Seeing: 3
Transparency: –
Weather: In the beginning of my session clear sky, after an hour getting cloudy, calm, no Moon, no snow, +1C – 0C

Objects observed: NGC 157, 6217

This observing session was my third and last in December 2016, and it was also my last session during year 2016. This session was interrupted prematurely by clouds, and I was able to observe only to objects. These objects were galaxies listed in Herschel 400 -observing list, one of them in Cetus and another in Ursa minor.

NGC 157

My first object of this session was NGC 157, an SBbc spiral galaxy located in Cetus. This galaxy can be found when moving ~4 degrees east from iota Cet. Of this object, I wrote following notes:

@165x: this galaxy appeared as a faint, oval-shaped glow with uniform brightness distribution. Long axis appears to be in W-E orientation. No core visible.

161228-29_NGC 157
NGC157 observed with 11”Catadioptric

After having observed this galaxy, I had observed all Herschel 400 objects in Cetus, and I could finally check that constellation finished on my observing list!

NGC 6217

My second and last object for this session was NGC 6217, a galaxy located in totally different area of sky, Ursa minor. This northern galaxy is of type SBbc R, which means that it is a barred-spiral galaxy with some kind of ring structure. The galaxy is located 2,5 degrees NE from zeta Umi or 2,5 degrees N from eta Umi. Of this galaxy, I wrote following lines:

@165x: this galaxy appeared as a relatively faint glow with uniform brightness distribution. In the center, there is a relatively bright, stellar core. The galaxy is elongated, long axis appears to be in N-S orientation.

161228-29_NGC 6217
NGC 6217 observed with 11”Catadioptric

So, now I had been able to observe two objects during this session, but then clouds were coming an I was forced to stop observing. Next observing sessions happened January 2017, I’ll be writing about them later!